The Border of Abstraction – Where is it?

i have followed the career of Andrew Piedilato for several years. today i’m going to discuss a few of his paintings, and talk about his development over that time period.

this kind of analysis is what we often do in our Focus On Abstraction weekly seminars. Check us out! well worth the small monthly subscription fee.

i have found work by Piedilato that pre-dates the years i will talk about today, but i’m not covering that early work here. but i will say that it is very much in line with the developments he has pursued since then.

this kind of analysis is what we often do in our Focus On Abstraction weekly seminars. Check us out! well worth the small monthly subscription fee.

i have found work by Piedilato that pre-dates the years i will talk about today, but i’m not covering that early work here. but i will say that it is very much in line with the developments he has pursued since then.

the earliest two works are from 2010. the piece, “Hummingbird” depicts in somewhat realistic terms a sinking boat. the horizon of the purple sky is uneven, making the viewer feel the waves of the water. the water itself, painted with varying levels of transparency over a dark background, gives a great feeling of depth and distance. the bottom of the painting, this overlay is slightly translucent, but as that paint migrates up the canvas, it becomes more and more opaque, which an additional depth element. the “subject” is simple to understand. a sinking boat. with shattered pieces floating here and there. but the strikingly great thing is the red bow/prow, rising up just above the horizon, and touching the violet sky. topped by a worn yellow pirate ship bowsprit: a nostalgic? threatening? reference, but either way, adding a bit more emotional depth.

the second painting from 2010 is “Ice Boat II”. here the color palette goes sweet, with the exception of the mustard yellow, with an even more sour subject. another shipwreck, with fragmented broken planks creating a carefully carefree geometric abstraction all on its own. a seemingly chaotic scene, with icebergs in the background, against a romantic peach sky. these discordant relationships – both compositionally, and emotionally, do the reverse of what a Fragonard (of a similar palette) does. here we have chaos and death in (ironic) decorator hues. we sense a deeper message. something that is hard to convey with a completely abstract painting. although a few painters (notably DeKooning) managed to do it. anguish. sorrow. an indifferent universe.

i will be critiquing two more Piedilato paintings in my Focus on Abstraction workshop – exclusively available on artistvenu. so sign up for my workshops (Abstraction Academy), participate in elevated discussions about abstract artwork, as well as your own work, in a safe artist-supportive and artist-supported environment.

Shared By: Jay Zerbe

A full-time artist with 50+ years of working experience, Jay Zerbe continues to create original abstract work inStudio as well as developing and instructing art courses and hosting webCasts on artistVenu.

In addition, Jay teaches part-time at The Lubeznik Center for the Arts in Michigan City, IN.

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@peepso_user_31(Denise Gonyea Durak)
Very effective especially with that uneven tipped purple or magenta colored sky. The beautiful long brush strokes really allow the viewer to feel the depth of the turmoil of that sinking boat. It's… Read more
@peepso_user_22(Jay Zerbe)
@peepso_user_31(Denise Gonyea Durak) as you will see, he gets more abstract as he goes on!